Martin Janecky Demonstration Film

The Youtube film shows master glassblower Martin Janecky demonstrating at the Corning Museum of Glass. We are so lucky to have him visit the UK for an exclusive Demonstration this coming weekend. View workshop…

Come along and be inspired! Book now!

 

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Martin Janecky Weekend

Martin Janecky Exclusive Weekend

Experience the amazing glassblowing skills of the world-renowned Czech master glass artist Martin Janecky – 3rd and 4th May 2014.

An exclusive weekend workshop where you can watch, close up and first hand, the unparalleled skills of Martin Janecky as he demonstrates some of his fantastic sculptural hot glass techniques. This unique experience brought to you by the Glass Hub will be hosted at the nearby Devereux and Huskie Glassworks in Wiltshire. The workshops and will run from 10am – 4pm each day. The cost of the weekend is £150.

For further details please call KT on 07866 426990 or click the link below to book online. Lunch will be provided at £5 per day. Dinner on Sat evening will be £10, including drinks, food, music and a wood fire at The Glass Hub (payable on the day). We will provide a taxi service if possible. We really hope you can join us for this one-off event, hopefully a taster of a more detailed master-class with Martin in 2015.

for more information on Janecky:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Martin-Janecky/151830991489
http://www.cmog.org/bio/martin-janecky

Form to Fuse with Andrea Spencer

Forming delicate 3D work

A weekend of cross-pollination between lampworking and fusing was led by the talented artist Andrea Spencer, who came over from Northern Ireland to share her knowledge. This was a new direction for us and involved “drawing with glass” using the torch, to create delicate and beautiful designs to both tack and flat fuse onto sheet ready for firing in the kiln.

Andrea’s work generally takes two paths: public art commissions and autonomous sculpture. Her large scale works where she uses her skills with architectural glass to create installations and site specific work can be found in several arenas. Her fine sculpture includes the beautiful ‘mermaid’ purses and the most delicate and wonderful small works.
Andrea guided the students through the process of creating small sculptural pieces on the torch and then placing this delicate 3d glass imagery onto flat Bullseye sheet and just tacking it down. It’s a really new way to work. Andrea also showed students how to use that wasted Bullseye glass, by cutting it into strips, and with holders (that our wonder David Billington knocked up to Andreas design) students were able to make use of it by melting it on the torch to form and pull out stringers and make whatever they chose. A great tip! This course investigated solid sculpting, carving/texturing and construction on the torch, then using manipulation of heat from the kiln, fusing these elements onto a flat surface..

A really practical and creative way to work. We hope everyone left feeling as inspired as we did watching her create beautiful work and sharing her knowledge of glass, both lamp and kiln. Thanks Andrea!

Scott Benefield’s Murrine Masterclass

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Our April masterclass was enriched by some spectacular demos and techniques shared by the cane working and Murrine master, Scott Benefield.  An American now living in Northern Ireland, this is Scott’s second visit to The Glass Hub.  We had four returning students and two new to welcome, and what with all the plates, forks and extra bits around, the workshop felt really busy.  That makes it sound like some sort of feast, which it was, of course, if you like flat sections of square glass, lined up, heated and squashed together to make a flat sheet, then rolled up, sealed and blown into beautiful mosaic style vases.  read more…

Scott Benefield’s Murrine Masterclass

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Our April masterclass was enriched by some spectacular demos and techniques shared by the cane working and Murrine master, Scott Benefield.  An American now living in Northern Ireland, this is Scott’s second visit to The Glass Hub.  We had four returning students and two new to welcome, and what with all the plates, forks and extra bits around, the workshop felt really busy.  That makes it sound like some sort of feast, which it was, of course, if you like flat sections of square glass, lined up, heated and squashed together to make a flat sheet, then rolled up, sealed and blown into beautiful mosaic style vases.

Day 1
On day one students were thrown into the slightly alien arena (for glass blowers anyway) of cutting sheet glass into strips and making stacks of around 16 sheets, 1.5 by 6 inches long.(mostly opaque colours for better visual, as it’s all seen on edge). It was a blessing having Helga around, and with her expertise in cutting and kiln work, the kiln was loaded in no time and soon 20 or so stacks were in the kiln and rising up to 750 degrees.

Once the stacks were in the kiln, Scott moved everyone through to the hot shop, and showed them the process of pulling Murrine bar from furnace glass with coloured frit to create a clear inner and colour outer surround when cut in cross section.

Students gathered, rolled, pulled, squashed square, and by jumping up onto the bench, pulled the cane down to the correct length and width, on the way discovering the correct temperature for a decent and even pull. We used the airline to help, but held off from using the torch, to avoid scorched faces and legs.  Sara had treated us to the “scorched fringe” look from the annealer.

So, with this pulling experience now under their belts and a decent lunch in their bellies, everyone launched into an afternoon of pulling spectrum sheets into square sections of Murrine bar. These 3ft sections were then broken in half, and placed in the lehr to anneal ready for day two.

We were fortunate to have Sonja Klingler and Katie Huskie around that afternoon, as they picked up the fused bars with Scott, and soon the kiln became empty and the lehr was stacked with beautiful colours and cross sectioned stripes.

Day 2
An eager group of students arrived on day two to start the chopping process. All the sections are cut to approximately the same depth, (this is harder than it looks), and laid out on a kiln shelf, contained by steel bars. We were treated to a great demo from Scott, as he picked up his first plate of Murrine, and proceeded to blow a beautiful flattened vessel. It’s hard to believe, but from jigsaws of mosaic glass, heated, squashed and pressed into a solid sheet …a blown vessel can be formed!

Students were given the opportunity to fuse another couple of stacks, and prepare a plate of their own, ready to make their first vessel in the afternoon.
So it was a finely tuned system we had going by the mid-afternoon.  James Devereux was on hand to do all the plate heatings and the lifting, as well as instruct and advise.  He is so brilliant to have around, so diverse is his knowledge for each course!

Murrine sheets were soon developing as students each picked up, joined, rolled and blew a piece each before the end of the day.  And everyone got one in!! Scott showed students how to use solid bar Murrine, (Dick Marquis style), and although there was no time for students to practice this, they will have the opportunity to try it if ever at a hot shop with no spectrum glass to hand!

As poor Brian acknowledges, it’s frustrating to have a piece drop from the punty and smash on the floor, but after this amount of preparation in cutting, chopping, heating etc …it’s heart-breaking!  Such is the nature of this beast called glass.

Day 3,
…and it’s all hands on deck! Students were in early, chopping, preparing and starting to blow the last two pieces each.  It gave me such pleasure to see the amount everyone had learned in the previous two days, thanks to Scott’s lovely way of teaching and smooth instruction.
Another great demo, this time a tall vase in red, white and black…

The day finished on time, with most achieving two finished blown pieces. Then everyone was rushing back to real life, away from the crazy-paving world of Murrine; back to Ireland, Switzerland, Aberdeen, Milton Keynes and Southhampton. it was an absolute joy of a course to run.

Thanks to Scott Benefield for sharing the knowledge and running a highly accurately timed course in such a cool and relaxed manner.  I hope students are inspired by his wonderfully open attitude to making glass where he works very much “with” the material, not attempting to “master” it.
A big thanks to James Devereux, Sonja Klingler and Katie Huskie for their invaluable help, and to a great group of students, who all made this incredible weekend such a patchwork of success.

KT Yun

MAX JACQUARD MASTERCLASS – CASTING INSIDE OUT and OUTSIDE IN

photo 2This 4 day workshop explored the concept of casting an object within an object, using the kiln forming process of lost wax, but with a few beautifully developed specialist Max techniques. Students started the course by taking a cast of a simple cup, which first had to be filled with plaster from the inside, then once core was solid, the container removed, and the plaster mould is then dipped in wax many times over to build up a depth of wall. Students were then allowed to use their own chosen objects, which consisted of everything from teeth to ducks! Max showed them how to use silicone and extra fast catalyst, and the next few days were spent in a controlled frenzy of all the different techniques they had learnt……….

Max Jacquard Masterclass – Casting Inside Out and Outside In

 

This 4 day workshop explored the concept of casting an object within an object, using the kiln forming process of lost wax, but with a few beautifully developed specialist Max techniques.


Students started the course by taking a cast of a simple cup, which first had to be filled with plaster from the inside, then once core was solid, the container removed, and the plaster mould is then dipped in wax many times over to build up a depth of wall.
This in turn is then decorated/carved or left pure, then cast again in plaster surround. The result is a wax vessel encased with plaster…..this wax is then steamed out……leaving a cavity, that can then be filled with glass.

Students were then allowed to use their own chosen objects, which consisted of everything from teeth to ducks! Max showed them how to use silicone and extra fast catalyst, and the next few days were spent in a controlled frenzy of all the different techniques they had leant. The chosen casting materials Max Jacquard uses are crystalcast and keramicast, as opposed to potters plaster and flint

We had a glassblowing class alongside on Saturday, and discovered some hidden sectors of some of those kiln casters, as they crept through and had a blow at lunch and after class! Nice to see a bit of cross over from kiln to furnace!

The personal projects of students took hold of the final day, as everyone rushed to complete their moulds, some even taking them home, to fire in their own kilns..Thank you so much to Charlotte, for all the help and advice and patient assistance you gave everyone. This was a better course for having your amazing skills and calmness around, and we hope you can also come back to us to help on Angela Jarman’s Masterclass in Sept.

Almost everyone made it to our evening rendezvous on the Saturday evening, this time in the lovely town of Frome. Apologies for the lack of meat at dinner again Val, you did really well putting up with no meat lunches, and on that note would like to thank Susan, Cook at The Garden Cafe, Frome, for all the great soups, delicious flans and cakes she supplies us with at The Glass Hub.

So, thank you everyone who came, and especially to the legend, (young legend!), Max Jacquard, for an amazing and unique class and sharing his knowledge and wisdom, so encouraging growth in British casting.